Attention Ohio Employers: Opportunity get a PowerMate® and SAVE 75%!

Posted by Contributing Editor on Wed, Jul 17, 2013

Breaking News:  Qualified customers in the State of Ohio can now potentially SAVE 75% (Just increased from 66%) off their PowerMate® motorized stair climbers and/or LiftGates purchased by contacting the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (OhioBWC) and applying for the PowerMate - Ohio BWC Safety Grant Program

This is an unprecedented opportunity to implement a PowerMate® Safety Moving Solution for your organization and avoid preventable lifting related injuries and accidents!

From the OhioBWC web site July 11th, 2013:

OhioBWC - Employer:  (SafetyGRANT$)

More money, more options
Governor John R. Kasich recently approved an increase in funding for the safety intervention grant program from $5 million to $15 million. This means we're also increasing our match in the program. Effective July, 1, 2013, we will match every employer dollar with three dollars. Finally, we restored some safety interventions previously on our moratorium list (items we would not fund).

The purpose of the Safety Intervention Grant$ Program is to gather information about the effectiveness of safety interventions so that BWC may share the results with Ohio employers. The program is available to any Ohio state-fund or public employer who wishes to purchase equipment to substantially reduce or eliminate injuries and illnesses associated with a particular task or operation. The program is designed to work and partner with Ohio employers to establish safety intervention best practices for accident and injury prevention.

PowerMate - Ohio BWC Safety Grant Program  

For more information on the Ohio BWC Safety Intervention Grant Program, follow the link provided to view the PowerMate - Ohio BWC Safety Grant Program Overview and Application Form. Contact your local Ohio Bureau of Worker’s Compensation Representative TODAY to learn all the details!


Tags: Injury prevention, powered dolly, OhioWBC, powermate, safety moving system